Sociology Index

HETEROPHILY

Heterophily is the opposite of homophily. Heterophily is the tendency of individuals to collect in diverse groups.  Heterophily is also noticed in successful organizations. In Twitter we see both heterophily and homophiliy. Given the way Twitter works, inevitably people find themselves following or being followed by those with both dissimilar and similar interests. Heterophily is defined as the degree to which pairs of individuals who interact are different in certain attributes. Heterogamy is contrasted with Homogamy. Heterophily also may be mentioned in areas such as homogamy, exogamy, and endogamy. An homophily-heterophily Index indicates the degree to which an individual communicates with others who are either similar or dissimilar to himself on certain variables.

Heterophily, the tendency to interact with others of different type, also exists in nature. Research on collaboration networks suggests that people are likely to form heterophilic task-related ties with those who are complementary to their own skill sets. Hunter-gatherer society life is also characterised by long-term imbalances in productivity and consumption, and by the division of labour.

Everett Rogers in his book 'Diffusion Of Innovations' wrote "Heterophily, the mirror opposite of homophily, is defined as the degree to which pairs of individuals who interact are different in certain attributes". Through his work Rogers showed that heterophilious networks were better able to spread innovations.

An illustration of homophilous and heterophilous diffusion networks is provided by Rao, Rogers, and Singh (1980), who studied two Indian villages. One village was very innovative, while the other village had more traditional norms. Diffusion networks for a new rice variety were more homophilous in the traditional village. In comparison, the opinion leaders in the innovative village were younger, highly educated, and of a high social caste. In the more traditional village, diffusion network links were highly homophilous; Brahmins talked to Brahmins, Harijans talked to Harijans, and so forth. But the heterophilous network links aided rapid diffusion.

Coevolutionary networks with homophily and heterophily - Daichi Kimura and Yoshinori Hayakawa.
We have investigated a simple coevolutionary network model incorporating three processes, changes of opinions, homophily, and heterophily. In this model, each node holds one of G opinions and changes its opinion, as in the voter model. Homophily is the tendency for connections to form between individuals of the same opinions and heterophily is the opposite effect. If there is no heterophily, this model corresponds to the Holme and Newman model. We show that the behavior of this model without heterophily can be understood in terms of a mean field approximation. We also find that this model with heterophily exhibits topologically complicated behavior such as the small-world property.

Knowledge sharing, heterophily, and social network dynamics - Muneta Yokomatsu, Hitomu Kotani.
Abstract: This study formulates a model where (i) players are characterized by a knowledge set that changes endogenously by communication and (ii) some players have homophily preferences, while others have heterophily preferences. The study thus demonstrates that heterophilous players bridge different components and extend networks in an early stage and, subsequently, homophilous players take the role of a network hub that maintains network ties. It also illustrates the long-run knowledge distribution.

Heterophily in social groups formation: a social network analysis
Oriol Barranco, Carlos Lozares & Dafne Muntanyola-Saura.

Abstract: Research on heterophily as a relational phenomenon is mostly limited to specific professional contexts which do not include knowledge about status or value heterophily as a possible group-generating principle. This article tries to close this gap by proposing and applying a new method of data analysis to investigate this possible role of heterophily. We apply social network analysis to personal network data.

We introduce a conceptual distinction between two types of heterophily, what we call intra-category heterophily and inter-category heterophily, and we validate the adjusted residuals of contingency tables to measure these two types of heterophily. Then, we reconstruct the relational space of these heterophilous relations among categories or attributes defined by socio-demographic and status characteristics. Finally, we group by faction algorithm the categories or attributes that maintain denser heterophilous relationships with each other than with the rest.

Customer Preferences for Frontline Employee Traits: Homophily and Heterophily Effects. Sandra Streukens Tor W. Andreassen.
Abstract: Although previous research has underscored the significance of the personality traits of frontline employees in employee service behaviors, knowledge about customer preferences for frontline employees personality traits is lacking. The study proposes and tests a conceptual framework that reconciles two opposing theoretical perspectives, homophily and heterophily. The existing research in interpersonal psychology has only given limited support to the heterophily effect, whereas it has consistently evidenced the homophily effect.

A ‘Different Class’? Homophily and Heterophily in the Social Class Networks of Britpop
Peter Millward, Paul Widdop, Michael Halpin.
Abstract: In this article we examine the individuals who were the cultural workforce that comprised the ‘Britpop’ music scene of the 1990s. The focus of our analysis is homophily and heterophily to determine whether the clusters of friendships and working relationships of those who were ‘best connected’ in the scene were patterned by original social class position. We find that Britpop’s ‘whole network’ is heterophilic but that its ‘sub-networks’ are more likely to be social class homophilic. The sub-networks that remain heterophilic are likely to be united by other common experiences that brought individuals in the network to the same social spaces.

Heterophily in social groups formation: a social network analysis
Oriol Barranco, Carlos Lozares, Dafne Muntanyola-Saura.
Abstract: Abstract Research on heterophily as a relational phenomenon is mostly limited to specific professional contexts which do not include knowledge about status or value heterophily as a possible group-generating principle. This article tries to close this gap by proposing and applying a new method of data analysis to investigate this possible role of heterophily. We apply social network analysis to personal network data. As a preliminary, we introduce a conceptual distinction between two types of heterophily, what we call intra-category heterophily and inter-category heterophily, and we validate the adjusted residuals of contingency tables to measure these two types of heterophily.