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Syllabus - Rural Sociology, Sociology of Agriculture, Sociology of Food

Rural Sociology and Sociology of Agriculture, Abstracts, Bibliography, Journals, Books on Rural Sociology,

Introduction to Rural Sociology & Development

Syllabus - Rural Sociology oseda.missouri.edu

Syllabus - Rural Sociology instruct1.cit.cornell.edu

Cross-cultural Perspectives in Agricultural Labor: Oregon State University

Syllabus. Sociology 301. Rural Sociology: Agriculture & Social Change

Syllabus - FOOD, CULTURE AND SOCIETY - Professor Rachel Schurman
Hamburgers and a Coke, rice and beans, collard greens, wonton soup, crème brulee -- what meanings and feelings do these foods conjure up, and for whom? Where are their key ingredients produced? Who prepares these dishes, and who eats them?
This course is built on two key premises: first, that the production, distribution, and consumption of food involves relationships among different groups of people, and second, that one can gain great insights into these social relations and the societies in which they are embedded through a sociological analysis of food.

Among the themes this course will explore:
• the different cultural and social meanings attached to food
• class and diet
• food, culture and body image
• the industrialization of agriculture
• work in the food sector; fast food society
• the debate over genetically modified food
• and movements toward a more sustainable agriculture

Cross-cultural Perspectives in Agricultural Labor: Oregon State University
Learning Through Listening ES 499 ES 599 - aers.psu.edu/rsscig/ES_499.pdf
Course Directors: Erlinda Gonzales-Berry and Dwaine Plaza
Course Facilitator: Geoffrey Habron
Email addresses: egonzales-berry@orst.edu/ dplaza@orst.edu/ habrong@ucs.orst.edu
Course Goals:
To bring people from diverse backgrounds together to learn about cross-cultural perspectives in agricultural labor through listening, analysis and collaboration. These skills will be developed through adopting action-learning principals. The course embodies a non-traditional approach to learning that blurs the boundaries between teacher/student/community/researcher. Stakeholders with vested interests in the topic of study will be invited to tell their stories to a group of learners who will then have the
opportunity to reflect upon these stories in a collective setting. Shared reflection of the information obtained through intense listening experiences will contribute to the learners' understanding of issues presented from different social positions and perspectives.
Required Course Materials:
Ramon Perez (1991) Dairy of an Undocumented Immigrant. Houston: Arte Publico Press.
Valle, Isabel (1974) Fields of Toil. Washington: Washington State University Press.

Syllabus. Sociology 301. Rural Sociology: Agriculture & Social Change
aers.psu.edu/rsscig/sonnenfeld_301.pdf - David A. Sonnenfeld, Ph.D., Washington State University, Tri-Cities
OVERVIEW: This is an intensive, 4-week course on contemporary dynamics of agriculture and social change, with particular reference to global agro-food systems and Western USA agriculture. We will examine the interplay and articulation between the
globalization of trade in agricultural commodities, migration of agricultural labor, and the health of rural environments and communities. Evening sessions will focus on assigned readings. Saturday sessions will consist of two workshops on Agriculture
and Social Change, with particular reference to Washington state's apple industry; a field trip; and presentations of student research.

TEXTS REQUIRED
Bonanno, Alessandro, et al., eds. 1994. From Columbus to ConAgra: the globalization of agriculture and food. Lawrence, Kansas: University of Kansas Press.
Valle, Isabel. 1994. Fields of toil: a migrant family's journey. Pullman: WSU Press.
Wells, Miriam. 1996. Strawberry fields : politics, class, and work in California agriculture. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
Wright, Angus. 1991. The death of Ramón Gonzáles: the modern agricultural dilemma. Austin: University of Texas Press.
Subscription to local daily newspaper, e.g. Tri-City Herald.
RECOMMENDED
McMichael, Philip, ed. 1994. The global restructuring of agro-food systems. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
Mooney, Patrick and Theo J. Majka. 1995. Farmers' and farm workers' movements: social protest in American agriculture. New York: Twayne Publishers.
Sachs, Carolyn. 1996. Gendered fields: rural women, agriculture, and environment. Boulder, Colo.: Westview.
Allen, John C. and Donald Dillman. 1994. Against all odds: rural community in the information age. Boulder, Colo.: Westview.

WEEK 1 - GLOBALIZATION AND AGRO-INDUSTRY
REQUIRED
Bonanno, From Columbus to ConAgra (introduction, ch's. 1, 2, 4, 6)
RECOMMENDED
Bonanno, From Columbus to ConAgra (ch's. 3, 5)
McMichael, The global restructuring of agro-food systems
REQUIRED
Bonanno, From Columbus to ConAgra (ch's. 7-13)
Morning Workshop, 9 am - Noon - "The big apple: globalization of fruit production"
Afternoon Workshop, 1 - 4 pm - "Bursting at the seams: changing labor relations in Washington's fresh fruit industry"
REQUIRED
Schaeffer and Wahl, "The North American Free Trade Agreement: effects on Washington State agriculture"

WEEK 2 - AGRICULTURAL LABOR
Guest speakers: Teamsters/United for Change, Yakima
REQUIRED
Wells, Strawberry fields (preface, ch's 2-5)
RECOMMENDED
Mooney and Majka, Farmers' and farm workers' movements
REQUIRED
Wells, Strawberry fields (ch's 6-8)
ASSIGNMENT #4 - 2 pp. critical commentary on Wright
WEEK 3 - AGRICULTURE & THE ENVIRONMENT
REQUIRED
Wright, The death of Ramón Gonzáles (introduction, ch's 1-5)
RECOMMENDED
Sachs, Gendered fields: rural women, agriculture, and environment
WEEK 4 - AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITIES
REQUIRED
Valle, Fields of toil (introduction, ch's 1-8)
David Sonnenfeld 10/10/2000
RECOMMENDED
Allen and Dillman, Against all odds
Sociology 301. Rural Sociology

Introduction to Rural Sociology & Development
Sociology/Rural Sociology 140
Instructor: Damayanti Banerjee
I. COURSE OBJECTIVES
The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to issues of environmental inequality, human rights, and sustainable development as it pertains to rural communities in both developed and developing worlds. Using sociological theories and perspectives, we will:
(1) discuss concepts of “rurality” and place;
(2) explore the impact of globalization and sustainable development on agriculture and environment;
(3) identify factors associated with persistent rural poverty, hunger and environmental degradation; and
(4) discuss various strategies for building more sustainable environments for rural communities.
The overriding goal of the course is to improve students' ability to think reflexively about social, and economic, and environmental issues in rural communities.

II. REQUIRED TEXTS
Giddens, Anthony (with Mitchell Dunnier & Richard P. Applebaum). 2003. Introduction to Sociology. 4th edition. Norton: New York
Humphrey, Craig R., Lewis, Tammy L., Buttel, Frederick H. 2003. Environment, Energy, and Society: Exemplary Works. Thomson & Wadsworth.
Book reading and reflection project (28% of your grade): All students are expected to “read a book” from the list below:
1. Cost of Living – Arundhati Roy
2. Fast Food Nation – Eric Schlosser
3. Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply – Vandana Shiva
4. Genocide in Nigeria: The Ogoni Tragedy – Ken Saro-Wiwa
5. Everything in Its Path: Destruction of Community in the Buffalo Creek Flood -Kai T. Erikson
6. Woman on the Edge of Time – Marge Piercy
7. Sand County Almanac: And Sketches Here and There – Aldo Leopold
8. Living Downstream: A Scientist’s Personal Investigation of Cancer and the Environment – Sandra Steingraber
9. Five Past Midnight in Bhopal: The Epic Story of the World’s Deadliest Industrial Disaster – Dominique LaPierre & Javier Moro
10. Unsettling of America: Culture & Agriculture – Wendell Berry
11. The Monkey Wrench Gang – Edward Abbey
12. Coming Home to Eat: Gary Paul Nabhan

The Rural Landscape: Theorizing Rural Communities
Flora et al. 1992. “The Rural Landscape”. In Rural Communities: Legacy & Change
Selznick, Philip. 1996. “In Search of Community” In William Vitek and Wes Jackson (eds.), Rooted in the Land; Essays on Community and People. New Haven: Yale University Press
Berry, Wendell. 1996. “Conserving Communities”. In William Vitek and Wes Jackson (eds.), Rooted in the Land; Essays on Community and People. New Haven: Yale University Press

The Rural Landscape: Place and Culture in rural communities
Paige, Harry W. 1996. "Leave If You Can." Pp. 11-14 in William Vitek and Wes Jackson (eds.), Rooted in the Land; Essays on Community and People. New Haven: Yale University Press
Nickell, David. 2001. “Land Between the Lakes: The Story of Colonialism in Kentucky”. In Network News, Sociologists for Women in Society: Spring 2001 Volume XVIII, No. 1 Kloppenburg, Jr. J et al. “Coming In to The Foodshed” In William
Vitek and Wes Jackson (eds.), Rooted in the Land; Essays on Community and People. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Globalization & Sustainable Development: A theoretical Exploration I
McMichael, Philip. 1996. “The Globalization Project” In Development and Social Change pp. 150-177
McMichael, Philip. 1996. “Development & Democracy” In Development and Social Change pp. 197-200 & 203-204
Humphrey et al. “The Sociology of Sustainable Development” In Energy, Environment & Society: Exemplary Works. pp. 345-352

Globalization & Sustainable Development: A theoretical Exploration II
Bruntland Commission. 1987. “Towards Sustainable Development.” Pp. 2-1 to 2-22 in Our Common Future. United Nations Environment Program, World Commission on Environment and Development
Sachs, Wolfgang. 2000. “Development: The Rise & Decline of an Ideal”
Shiva, Vandana. 2004. “The Suicide Economy of Corporate Globalisation.” ZNET Commentary, February 19th, 2004
zmag.org/bios/homepage.cfm?authorID=90
Guest Lecture

Environment, Development, and Rural Communities: The Question of Agriculture
Mittal, Anuradha. 2002. “Giving Away The Farm: The 2002 Farm Bill”. Food First Report
Berry, Wendell. 2002. “The Agrarian Standard” Orion Magazine oriononline.org/pages/om/02-3om/Berry.html
Shiva, Vandana. 2000. “The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply” In The Stolen Harvest
McMichael, Philip. 1996. “The Food Regime and the Changing Division of Labor” and “ Remaking Third World Agricultures” In Development and Social Change (pp. 58-75)

Environment, Development, and Rural Communities: The Question of Environment I
Humphrey et al. 2003. “Introduction: The Development of Environmental Sociology” In Environment, Energy and Society: Exemplary Works pp.1-14
Bell, Michael M. 2004. “Environmental Problems & Society” In An Invitation to Environmental Sociology
White, Lynn. 1967. “The Historical Roots of Our Ecological Crises.” Science 155:1203-1207
Erikson, Kai T. 1994. “Three-Mile Island: A New Species of Trouble.” Pp. 139-157 in A New Species of Trouble: Explorations in Disaster, Trauma, and Community. New York: Norton

Environment, Development, and Rural Communities: The Question of Environment II
Gottlieb, Robert. 1993. “Introduction”. Forcing the Spring: The Transformation of the American Environmental Movement
Belsky, Jill. 2003. “Misrepresenting Communities: The Politics of Community-Based Rural Ecotourism in Gales Point Manatee, Belize” In Humphrey et al. Environment, Energy and Society: Exemplary Works
Guha, Ramachandra. 1989. “Radical American Environmentalism and Wilderness Preservation: A Third World Critique.” Environmental Ethics 11:71-83
Guest Lecture

The Pressure of the “population bomb”: Developmental Consequences I
Bell, Michael M. 2004. “Population and Development.” In An Invitation to Environmental Sociology
Hardin, Garrett. 1974. “Living on a Lifeboat”.
Malthus, Robert Thomas. 1976 (1798). “Preface” and “Chapter 1.” Pp. 15-21 in An Essay on the Principle of Population. Philip Appleman, ed. New York: Norton
McKibben, Bill. 1998. “The case for single-child families.” The Christian Century. 115 (15) May 13, pp. 498-504
McKibben, Bill. 1998. “Immigrants aren't the problem. We are.” New York Times. March 9, p. A19
Nierenberg, Danielle and Mia MacDonald. 2004. “The Population Story…So Far.” World Watch Magazine 17(5):14-17
Pimentel, David and Anne Wilson. 2004. “World Population, Agriculture, and Malnutrition.” World Watch Magazine 17(5):22-25

The Pressure of the “population bomb”: Developmental Consequences II
Bongaarts, John. 2003. “The Demographic Consequences of Fertility Decline” In Environment, Energy and Society: Exemplary Works pp. 143-146
Lash et al. 2001. “Risk, Environment and Modernity: Towards a New Ecology”. In Giddens Sociology
Guest Lecture

The Struggle Over Hunger I
Buttel, Fred. 2003. “Ending Hunger in Developing Countries” In Environment, Energy and Society: Exemplary Works pp. 184-199
Lappé, Frances Moore, Joseph Collins, and Peter Rosset. 1998. “12 Myths About Hunger”. Institute for Food and Development Policy Backgrounder, Summer 1998, Vol.5, No. 3. Retrieved August 26. 2004, from
foodfirst.org/pubs/backgrdrs/1998/s98v5n3.html
McMichael, Philip. 2003. “Global Food Politics”. In Environment, Energy and Society: Exemplary Works pp. 219-228

The Struggle Over Hunger II
Humphrey et al. 2003. “The Struggle Over Hunger” In Environment, Energy and Society: Exemplary Works pp. 175-183
Bongaarts, John. 2003. “Can the Growing Human Population Feed Itself?” In Environment, Energy and Society: Exemplary Works pp. 200-207
Guest Lecture

The Struggle Over Hunger III
Sen, Amartya, K. “The Great Bengal Famine” In Poverty and Famine:
An Essay on Entitlement and Deprivation (New York: Oxford University Press, 1981)
Joseph Lappe et al, “Myth 1: There is Simply Not Enough Food,” in Lappe et al, World Hunger: Twelve Myths (New York: Grove Press, 1998)
Lappe et al, “Beyond the Myth of Hunger: What We Can Do,” in Lappe et al, World Hunger: 12 Myths (New York: Grove Press, 1998), pp. 171-179

Energy and Environment: How long will our resources last? I
Gelbspan, Ross 2001 “A modest proposal to stop global warming.” Sierra (May/June): 6267.
Rohter, Larry and Andrew C. Revkin. 2004 “Cheers, and concern, for new climate pact.” The New York Times (December 13): A6
Udall, Randy and Steve Andrews. 2004 “When will the joy ride end? Community Office for Resource Efficiency, dieoff.org/page138.htm
Goodstein, Eban. 2006. “Climate Change: What the World Needs Now is … Politics”. World Watch

Energy and Environment: How long will our resources last? II
Roberts, J. Timmons. 2003. “Global Inequality & Climate Change” In Environment, Energy and Society: Exemplary Works pp. 254-262
Video
The End of Suburbia: Oil Depletion & the Collapse of the American Dream

Gendered Environmentalisms
Bell, Michael M. 2004. “Gender and Environmental Domination.” In An Invitation to Environmental Sociology
Jackson, Cecile. 1993. “Doing What Comes Naturally? Women & Environment in Development”. World Development
Warren, Karen. 2000. “What are Ecofeminists Saying? An Overview of Ecofeminist Positions” in Ecofeminist Philosophy: A Western Perspective on What It Is and Why It Matters
RECOMMENDED READING:
Warren, Karen, 2000. “Nature is a Feminist Issue: Motivating Ecofeminists By Taking Empirical Data Seriously” in “Ecofeminist Philosophy: A Western Perspective on What It Is and Why It Matters

Fighting for Justice: Theorizing Global Environmental Movements I
Paul Mohai and Bunyan Bryant. 1992. "Environmental Racism: Reviewing the Evidence," in Bryant and Mohai (eds.), Race and the Incidence of Environmental Hazards (Westview Press, 1992)
Pulido, Laura. 2000. Rethinking Environmental Racism: White Privilege and Urban Development in Southern California” Annals of the Association of American Geographers Vol. 90: pp. 12-40
Robert D. Bullard, "Anatomy of Environmental Racism and the Environmental Justice Movement," pp. 15-39 in Robert D. Bullard, ed., Confronting Environmental Racism: Voices from the Grassroots

Fighting for Justice: Case Studies of Environmental Justice (US) II
Pellow, David. 2004. “The Politics of Illegal Dumping: An Environmental Justice Framework”. Qualitative Sociology
Bullard, Bob. 1990. “Dispute Resolution and Toxics: Case Studies” In Dumping in Dixie
Schwartz, John. 2005. Amid Devastation, Mounds of Toxic Waste Vie for Attention. New York Times (December 20)

Fighting for Justice: Case Studies of Environmental Justice (International)
Langewiesche, William. 2000. “The Shipbreakers” Atlantic Monthly. August
OR
What Happened in Bhopal?
VIDEO: Moyers, B. 1990. Global Dumping Ground: The International Traffic in Hazardous Waste

“The Greater Common Good”: Environmental Movements around the World I
Gibbs, Lois Marie. Learning from Love Canal: A Twentieth Century Retrospective
Roy, Arundhati. 1999. “The Greater Common Good” narmada.org/gcg/gcg.html
Anastasia M. Shkilnyk, "Part III: River of Poison", in A Poison Stronger than Love (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985), 179-91, 205-230

“The Greater Common Good”: Environmental Movements around the World II
Perlez, Jane & Raymond Bonner. 2005. “Below a Mountain of Wealth, a River of Waste”. New York Times (December 27)
Ken-Saro-Wiwa. “Introduction” and “Words from the Final Statement of Kenule Beeson Saro-Wiwa”. Genocide in Nigeria: The Ogoni Tragedy
“The Life and Death of Ken Saro-Wiwa: A History of the Struggle for Justice in the Niger Delta”.
“Zapatistas and the Chiapas Uprising, Ten Years on” swp.ie/resources/Zapatistas%2010%20years%20on.htm

“Coming Home to Eat”: Politics of Food
Magdoff, Fred, John Bellamy Foster & Frederick H Buttel. “An Overview”, in Hungry for Profit: The Agribusiness Threat to Farmers, Food and the Environment. Monthly Review Press. P. 7-21
Berry, Wendell. 1990. “The Pleasures of Eating” In Our Sustainable Table, edited by Robert Clark .
Schlosser, Eric. 2001. “Introduction” In Fast Food Nation
Rosset, Peter. 2003. “Food Sovereignty: Global Rallying Cry of Farmer Movements”. Food First

Biotechnology & Environment I
Pollan Michael. 1998 “Playing god in the garden” The New York Times Magazine (October 25): 4451, 62, 82, 92
Nash, J. Madeline. 2000 “Grains of hope.” Newsweek (July 31): 3846
Altieri, Miguel & Peter Rosset. 2003. “Ten Reasons Why Biotechnology Will Not Ensure Food Security, Protect The Environment, and Reduce Poverty in the Developing World”.AgBioForum.
Shiva, Vandana. 2000. “Genetic Engineering and Food Security”. In The Stolen Harvest

Biotechnology & Environment II
Rosset, Peter. 2000. “Anatomy of a Gene Spill: Do We Really Need Genetically Engineered Food?” Food First.

Consumerism and Development I
Ritzer, George. 2001“The Macdonaldization of Society: An investigation in to the changing character of social life” In Anthony Giddens, Sociology
Bell, Michael M. 2004. “Consumption & Materialism” In An Invitation to Environmental Sociology
Schor. Juliet. 2004. “The Changing World of Children’s Consumption”. In Born to Buy: The Commercialized Child and the New Consumer Culture pp. 19-37

Consumerism & Development II
Video - Walmart: The High Cost of Low Price

 

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